Resume Building (Literally)

Summer’s comin’ in hot, and for a lot of college students, that means crunch time for internship hunting. Sam Schwartz, a fourth year student in Industrial Relations, took a different approach. He decided to do something big—he made the world’s largest resume.

I know what you’re thinking- how does one even go about doing that? Or come up with the idea? Sam was inspired by an internship application that required applicants to make something no one had ever made before. The application didn’t have a resume submission component, so he was worried he wouldn’t be able to come up with an idea that would showcase both his past experience and skills. But at 3:00 am on a Wednesday night in April, in the midst of applying to other internships, he thought, “hey, I could still show them my resume, I’ll just do it a little differently.”

Although there’s no official record for the world’s largest resume, Sam searched the web and didn’t find anything about other people trying to do something like this. He spent the following weekend building and filming his entire process, from designing the type on the computer to stenciling rows of letters on a tarp in Thornden Park. 

He spent countless hours hunched over, carefully lining up his stencils with the to-scale grid he made using yarn and stakes– since there was no measuring tape long enough for his 20X30 foott final product. A friend lent him a drone to get aerial footage, which shows just how huge this thing really is. Sam said there were definitely a few times he wanted to quit, especially when his alarm rang at 6:00 am on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. But he trudged on, and has a lot to show for it.

Sam’s video already has over 3,000 views on Vimeo. He recently took an internship offer at a creative advertising firm in Chicago, and although it’s not the same internship that inspired him to build the resume, he’s still glad he followed through with it. Sam admitted that right now, the 30 ft tarp is just taking up a lot of space in his living room. But the experience, and his video, are testaments to his skills. If you want to see more of Sam’s work, check out his portfolio (samschwartz.design).

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Why I Went Orange

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When deciding on how to address giving advice on choosing a college, I considered my stylistic options. Should I make a list of considerations? Should I take quotes from friends? Or, should I just reminisce and free associate?

I’ve decided on the last option. Three years ago, I was in your shoes, trying to decide where to go to school. I was down to four schools in April, all around the same price and fairly equal in academic prestige. I didn’t know how to make my decision. I visited each school over April break, and Syracuse was the last one I visited.

Don’t get me wrong, I enjoyed the other schools. The accepted students days were nice, and one university had the largest freshman dorms I’d ever seen. But none of them had that “wow” factor, which I couldn’t explain at the time but I think I can now. I was looking for a school that gave me butterflies, that made me so excited to be a part of the community that I wouldn’t feel like I was leaving home, but just going to a new one. I found that at Syracuse.

When I visited Syracuse for the first time, it was five days before I had to make my final decision on where to attend college. It was a beautiful spring day, and I was looking forward to touring Newhouse, seeing the quad- you know, the basics. The Accepted Students seminar in Newhouse was the first thing that made me think, “okay, there is something different about this place.” We heard professors and students speak about the amazing resources in Newhouse and broke up into small group tours. I felt welcomed and eager to start my own education here.

But the real catch for me was just walking around campus and seeing how happy everyone was. I saw students wearing Syracuse sweatshirts, Greek Life T’s, and club hoodies. I saw friends exchange quick hellos on their way to classes, happy to see each other but still keeping their eyes on the prize. It was the perfect blend of social and intellectual life that I did not realize I had been looking for. Not to mention how passionate people were about SU. One kid literally yelled at our tour group, “You’re gonna regret it if you don’t go here!” Okay, so maybe SU isn’t the right fit for everyone, but for me he was right- I’m thankful every day that I decided to attend Syracuse University.

My excitement only grew over the summer. Freshman year was a blur of excitement, new experiences and adjusting to independence. Going into my sophomore year, I was worried the novelty of college would wear off. However, I quickly realized that my love for Syracuse did not shrink- it only grew. Nervous excitement transformed into a comfortable familiarity. When I see student tours on campus, I smile wide because I want them to know that I truly love this place. I only have a year and a half left here, and it doesn’t seem like nearly enough time because I am so, so happy. However, I know that when the time comes, I’ll be ready to face the next chapter head-on, thanks to four years of personal growth and self-discovery here at SU.

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Maybe I am a Typical Sorority Girl

To be honest, Greek life was never on my radar when I was applying to colleges. My cousin was in a sorority, but besides that, I had no connection to Greek life nor any desire to join. I used to even poke fun at sororities and believed every generalization made about sorority girls. In my eyes, sorority girls wore dresses and pearls, loved shopping, and never wore sweatpants. None of these are bad, but they definitely aren’t me.

Fast forward to the end of my first semester freshman year. I was on the fence about participating in recruitment. My roommate had been looking forward to signing up since September, but I almost backed out. I didn’t want to be someone I wasn’t. I didn’t want my friends at home to say I’d changed because I joined a sorority. The night before the deadline for signing up, my friend on the club lacrosse team, who is not in a sorority, convinced me to try recruitment. She said even though she personally didn’t like it, there was no harm in trying it out.

I still think about how thankful I am for her advice. I ended up going through recruitment and joining a house that was filled with amazing women from all walks of life. I’ve met some of my best friends through my sorority. They’re people who I can laugh with, people I can talk to, and people who inspire me to be my best self. It’s like being in seven different clubs, while only actually being in one. I love sports, I love volunteering, and I care about my grades. And these are all passions I have been able to pursue and enjoy while being in a sorority.

On weekends I participate in fun philanthropy events with my friends—everything from pancake eating contests to dodgeball tournaments, all while knowing the profits are going to a good cause, as each sorority and fraternity are involved with a specific charitable organization. On Halloween, my friends and I handed out candy to local youth students in the Boys and Girls Club who trick-or-treated on Walnut Avenue near campus. We have parties every weekend with hilarious themes, and I have never felt pressure to look, dress up, wear makeup, or act a certain way.

I now realize that my original perception of a “typical sorority girl” was based on looks alone. I now think a typical sorority girl is a positive way to describe any young woman who has found a home away from home in her Greek life.

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Do the Dorms Right

I can’t believe that last semester was my last semester living in the ‘Cuse dorms. I’m very excited to have a place off campus this fall, but dorm life is a such a great experience. You’re close to everything, constantly surrounded by friends, and you don’t have to worry about cooking for yourself or cleaning the bathroom. While ultra-convenient, living in a dorm still requires some planning and thought. Here I’ve listed my top five dorm room essentials, based on my on-campus housing experience:  

1. First Aid Kit/ Health Supplies box: Unfortunately, most people are bound to catch a cold at least once a semester (or three times, if you’re like me). It’s always good to have some cough drops or EmergenC on hand, especially during exams when it’s hard to find time to go to CVS.

2. Extra paper towels: Picture yourself lying in bed, studying (or watching Netflix.) You reach over to grab your cup of coffee without looking and spill it all over your desk. I find myself in this situation all too often. Trust me, toilet paper doesn’t get the job done. Keep a couple rolls of paper towels in your room so you don’t have to ask your neighbors for some or use your bath towel to wipe up your latest mess.

3. Doormat: Okay, this might not seem necessary, but trust me, it helps in a place like Syracuse. Coming home with muddy, snowy, wet boots at the end of a winter day and soaking the floor is not a fun way to end a long day of classes. Put your shoes on a small doormat right at the entrance. Not only will you keep the floor dry, but you’re also less likely to misplace your shoes and have to frantically search for them five minutes before class.

4. Bins for storage: Storage for clothes can be tricky, especially if you don’t plan on going home until the end of the semester. Syracuse weather changes very quickly, so even though it seems unnecessary when you move in August to pack a winter jacket, it’s not a bad idea. That being said, you don’t want to be rummaging through your winter hats and sweaters in September when it’s 60 degrees out. Stack storage bins under your bed to keep your clothes organized, easily accessible, but still out of the way.

5. Extra quarters/small bill for laundry: The laundry machines can be a bit temperamental. I’ve been stuck with a pile of wet clothes more than once when the card reader (which you can use to pay for laundry from money on your SuperCard account) wasn’t working. And it’s tougher than you’d think to find someone in the dorms with a spare quarter, so having a few bucks on hand can help you avoid air-drying clothes in your room or exchanging a $20 for 80 quarters.

There ya have it! Pack up these five extra things as you are getting ready to head to the hill and you are ready-made for an even smoother dorm experience.

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

SU (Abroad) Students Give Thanks

A year ago, one of my first published blogs for Syracuse Admissions focused on a seemingly simple question: What are Syracuse students thankful for? This was one of my favorite blogs to write. In the midst of busy college life, it was great to just sit and talk with people about what makes us happy, about the people in our lives who bring us joy. This year, I’m excited to share the 2016, second annual edition of what SU students are thankful for. This year, all of us are abroad and celebrating away from home but still as grateful as ever.

“I’m thankful for another year of life. Another year to grow and experience new things with my friends and family.” — Obi Afriyie, Junior, studying in Dublin, Cultural Foundations of Education and History Major, Member of Student Association, Founder of Syracuse Students Teaching Healthy Habits

“I am so thankful my parents pushed me to move to Italy and travel the world. I’ve realized how great a gift it is to be able to travel and see the world at 18 and I’m so happy I got that chance.”– Jessica Hume, Freshman, Discovery Florence

“I’m thankful for all the opportunities SU provides to its students. Whether it’s class, clubs, communities, or the chance to meet people different than you, I think it’s a university with truly something for everyone.”– Joey Dawson, Junior, studying in Strasbourg, Policy Studies and Information Management Major, Member of SU Kumquat and the Academic Integrity Student Panel

“Since being abroad I’ve realized the things I’m most thankful for. I’m most thankful for my family and friends because their support and love is what motivates and encourages me to do my best. I’m also thankful for the small experiences that I’ve been lucky enough to have and share with those I love. I will have these moments to cherish for the rest of my life and they have helped to shape who I am today.”– Alex Dorn, Junior, studying in Florence, Public Relations Major and Political Science Minor, Member of Public Relations Student Society of America and Hill Communications

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Embracing Abroad

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I am currently studying abroad in Florence, Italy, with the Syracuse University Abroad program. This is my first trip outside of the United States — I’ve never even been to Canada. As this is my first time leaving the country, I naturally want to do anything and everything. When I was planning my weekend trips over the summer, I had every weekend booked. I wanted to visit all of the places I had only seen in movies or read about it books. In my mind, this was my once-in-a-lifetime experience, my chance to see the world.

When I got to Florence, the reality of time sunk in. Sure, three months sounds like a long time, but trying to squeeze in everything I wanted to do was impossible. On top of that, most of my friends who I am traveling with have already been to Europe, so some of the top places I wanted to go were places that they had already seen. I had a very specific vision of what I wanted my abroad experience to be, and when it didn’t go exactly as planned, I started obsessing about it. For most of September and the beginning of October, I was constantly online searching for places to travel to, trying to find the cheapest flights, texting friends trying to convince them to travel with me for the fourth weekend in a row.

A few days ago, I was sitting in a piazza near the SU Florence campus, using an app on my phone to search cheap flights. I realized I had been sitting there for 45 minutes, completely oblivious to everything going on around me. I did not see the beautiful street art two feet away from me, or the man playing the violin in the center of the piazza, or the brilliant hues of yellow and red in the changing leaves. When I looked up and took it all in, it hit me: I was spending so much time obsessing about seeing everything that I wasn’t really seeing anything.

I’ve been trying too hard to make this experience perfect. Studying abroad is an opportunity to discover your passions, see new things, and embrace cultures different from your own. It’s not about getting the most stamps on your passport. It’s about seeing what you can, living in the moment, and stepping out of your comfort zone. I closed most of those tabs a few days ago. I’m ready to see where the rest of the semester takes me, and hopefully I will be more open to the beauty right in front of me.

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Winning Over Your Professors

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Starting college means getting used to a lot of new things: living in dorms, class lectures, and writing papers worth 30% of your grade. One of the things that can make the adjustment to college easier is developing good relationships with your professors. I’ve come up with a few do’s and don’ts for professor communication and classroom etiquette.

Unlike high school, college professors are not just at SU to teach. They also have their own research, and many of them work outside the university. College is a privilege, not a given, so professors are less likely to tolerate immature behavior then your high school teachers were. As such:

DON’T text during class. In a small classroom, it may seem like your being discrete with one hand on your notebook and the other under the desk, but these people have PhD’s- they know what you’re hiding. It may be difficult for a professor to see you texting in a large lecture hall, but you’re still distracting yourself from the important information that WILL BE ON THE EXAM!

DON’T surf the web during class. Some of your professors will allow you to bring your laptop to class. It’s very tempting to check Facebook or see how your fantasy football team is doing, but if your professor catches you, they won’t hesitate to call you out in front of everyone. In large lecture halls, a lot of professors have teaching assistants spread out through the audience, so even if your professor can’t see your screen, it’s possible a TA will.

DON’T pack up before the end of class. The rustling of papers three minutes before class is over is annoying and disruptive. This sends a message that you are not interested in what the professor has to say and are just watching the clock until you can leave.

DO proofread emails. Email is most professors’ choice way of communicating with students. Professors are very good about checking their emails. If you’re going to send an email, make sure you read through it so that it makes sense, gets to the point, and doesn’t have any spelling or grammatical errors. I’ve had professors correct my spelling in emails- trust me, it’s embarrassing.

DO go to office hours. Professors are happy to provide help during their office hours. If you want to go over a problem on a test or discuss a reading you didn’t quite understand, office hours are going to be your best friend. However, make sure you go to office hours with specific questions to ask- professors aren’t going to plan out a study guide for you.

DO participate in class. I know, I know, sometimes it’s embarrassing to be that kid who raises their hand. But this is me in every class. You don’t need to answer every question and wave your arm wildly in the air for an hour, but answering a question or two in class shows your professor that you are engaged and listening (participation points!)

This is by no means a definitive list of dos and don’ts–there’s a whole lot more, but the key idea is get to know your professor and how they run their classes. Some professors don’t mind if you eat a snack during class. Others find it disruptive. Take note of what your professors expect from you. Remember, your professors are not only your ticket to your education, but also potentially important networking connections. Who knows, you could be reaching out to one of your favorite professors in a few years for a letter of recommendation, so make your time in class count!

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Seriously, Don’t Skip Class (especially the 8 am’s!)

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I was not looking forward to 8 a.m. classes when I started college. In fact, I was a little weary of classes in general. I’d heard from some older friends that you go to college and spend four years in giant lecture halls, memorizing information, regurgitating it for a test, and then completely forgetting it. I expected I’d be able to skip a lot of classes and I would never get to know my professors. However, I am almost halfway through my undergraduate education, and I’m glad to say that, at least in my experience, I was very, very wrong about college classes. Here’s a little insight into what I was thinking:

My expectation for college classes:

Ugh, it’s Monday and I have an 8 a.m.

I get up, drink three cups of coffee, throw on a sweatshirt and walk to class. I sit among 80 other kids who are asleep with their eyes open. Our professor talks, and talks and talks. No one asks questions because it’s very uncool to be interested. I secretly text under my desk, but of course no one’s awake, so I curl up and close my eyes. I don’t think I’m going to go on Wednesday. I can basically teach myself all of this. I’ll just show up for the midterm and the final and I’ll be good.

Reality:

It’s Monday and I have an 8 a.m. I get up, drink three cups of coffee, throw on a sweatshirt and walk to class (that’s never changing). I walk into a classroom with 15 other students. We’re all tired, but ready to work. Our professor discusses what the focus is for the day. We spend about half an hour openly discussing the latest topic, and then we break up into two groups and work on our respective PR campaigns–campaigns we are executing for real clients with real goals and real contributions to society. We stay a few extra minutes after class to call our client and plan for what needs to be done for Wednesday.

What a change, right?

As a public relations major, every class I have taken thus far has been goal-oriented and focused on experience. I am currently taking Public Relations Writing in a Digital World, and we are working with Syracuse alum Michael Short, ’10, President of the Global Social Enterprise Institute (GSEI) and CEO of Short Enterprises. The Institute, an initiative of Short Enterprises with more than 250 university and institutional collaborators and projects spread across six continents, provides consulting for socially engaged organizations. Over the past few years, GSEI has had over 100 students and a number of courses involved in their work from the Newhouse, Maxwell and Whitman Schools.

Short and Professor Joe Cunningham have given myself and my classmates the priceless opportunity to essentially intern for a well-respected organization and earn credits simultaneously. We didn’t have to apply. We didn’t have to interview. All we have to do is show up to class and try our best.

I truly love going to a school where the professors not only respect the students, but also encourage us to rise to expectations that we may have never set for ourselves. So if you ever think about skipping your morning classes, think about what you’re missing. It might be in that class you realize a love for what you’re doing, or at the very least perhaps, you may realize that 8 a.m. class offers much more than you expected.

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Abroad for a Cause

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Caitlin Grimm: bottom row, far right

Over winter break, Caitlin Grimm, a Syracuse sophomore, traveled to Honduras to volunteer with other students as part of the Global Medical Brigade. I sat down with Cait to talk about her unique experience.

What is your major/ dream job?

I am a Biology major, Chemistry minor and IT minor. When it comes to my dream job, I have a few different levels of dream job–my “within reach” dream job, my “a bit of a stretch” dream job, and my “reach for the stars” dream job. My “within reach” dream job is to be a clinical pharmacist (a pharmacist in a hospital setting). I love working with people, and so this setting would allow me to meet and help more people than if I worked in a retail pharmacy. My “a bit of a stretch” dream job would involve me going back to school to get my MBA, then working in pharmaceutical administration.  My “reach for the stars” dream job involves me starting my own company that works in health care reform.

How did you find out about this trip and what inspired you to go?

I found out about this trip through friends of mine who had gone on trips with the Global Medical Brigade organization before. One of those friends has since graduated, and now actually works for Global Medical Brigades in Nicaragua. I was inspired to go because of the incredible stories I had heard from them, but also because, I’ve always wanted to bring medical assistance to third-world countries, and so this was the perfect opportunity to start getting involved.

What were you most excited about and what were you most nervous about?

I was most excited about meeting the members of the community. I’ve never been to another country before (except Canada), so I was really excited to immerse myself in a completely different culture. I was nervous about a few things, mainly about speaking the language. I took Spanish in high school, but it had been so long since I’d spoken it that I wasn’t sure how well I’d remember.

Have you gone abroad before/ planning on studying abroad? How was this experience different that a typical study abroad trip?

Unfortunately, I haven’t studied abroad. However, I’ve had many friends who have, and I can tell you that an experience like mine is very different from studying abroad. First of all, it’s much shorter (one week compared to a whole semester). The experiences are very different because you don’t get to do as much on a trip like mine. The most significant difference though is the pure nature of the trips. Studying abroad is an amazing experience, but it’s very tourism-based. My experience was about as non-touristy as you can get, considering we were working in remote villages in the mountains of Honduras. It’s also a trip that eventually ends up helping and affecting so many people in the communities we worked in. I don’t mean to be cliche, but the feeling that comes with helping others is completely incomparable to anything else, and it is what made the trip so special.

What was something that surprised or intrigued you about Honduran culture?

The Honduran culture is so incredibly different from American culture in that almost everything I experienced in Honduras surprised me in one way or another. For example, it is not customary in Honduran culture to brush your teeth. This might not sound like a huge deal, but it actually causes major health problems. One of the main exports of Honduras is sugar cane, so all food containing sugar in Honduras contains pure cane sugar. This leads to the rapid development of cavities, and without dentists or teeth-brushing habits, untreated cavities can lead to infection and even death if the infection spreads through the body. Finding out things like this really opened my eyes and inspired me to want to continue working in communities like this for the rest of my life.

What is your favorite memory from the trip?

My favorite memory from the trip was working in a station called “Charla” in the medical clinics we set up. We worked with the children after they went  to the medical and dental stations and taught them healthy habits, like the importance of a balanced diet or how to brush their teeth. I know it doesn’t sound like much, but working with the children was so unbelievably heart-warming, and seeing the looks on their faces when we gave them their first tooth-brushes was something I’ll never forget. Most of these children don’t have anything to call their own, and their hugs of appreciation made the whole trip worth it. But even more rewarding than all of that was knowing that what we taught them would have a positive impact on the rest of their lives. This made me feel like we had left our mark on the community and that we would continue to influence these people’s lives, even after we were gone.

Do you have any suggestions for students who want to do a service trip?

I could talk for hours about service trips, but here are my top 3 suggestions:

  • Make sure you go on a trip with a reputable organization. There are many credible organizations you can go through, and there are multiple groups at Syracuse that organize student trips, but I have nothing but amazing things to say about the Global Medical Brigades organization that I went through. The local chapter at Syracuse is run by really incredible people and globally they are a very well-respected.  
  • Know all of your options for fundraising. Financing a trip like this can be a burden for some, but there are many ways to raise money and make the cost much more manageable. There are multiple options when it comes to fundraising, but I chose to go through a site called “empowered.org”, which works directly with the Global Medical Brigade.  I sent out the link to my page to all of my friends and family around Christmas and asked for donations in lieu of gifts.
  • Make sure you have medicine just in case. The one thing I neglected to bring with me that I wish I had was cold medicine. Because of the drastic change in climate between New York in the winter and Honduras, I ended up feeling under the weather for a few days, and that was the last thing I wanted to be worrying about while on such an amazing adventure.

Three words to describe your experience?

Inspiring, fulfilling, joyful.

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

S(no)w Worries

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When I tell people I go to Syracuse University, they usually ask me two things: how are the basketball games? and how do I deal with the snow? The basketball games let me first say are amazing. As for snow, Syracuse is one of the snowiest cities in the country so boots and long, heavy jackets are essential from January to late March. I got used to walking through snowstorms last year, but this is the first time I’ve had my car on campus, and driving is a whole other story.

I arrived to school this semester late on a Monday night, and classes started Tuesday. I drove in during a snowstorm, so I decided to park my car in a parking lot close to my dorm (a lot I am not actually permitted to park in.) When I woke up early the next morning to move my car back to South Campus, I groaned when I saw that my tires were almost completely buried. I had brought two shovels from home, so I called my roommate and together we started shoveling(shoutout to my awesome roomie.) After about half an hour, we were finally able to turn my car on and back it out a few feet. Unfortunately, our luck did not last. I don’t have four-wheel drive (basically a necessity in ‘Cuse), and my tires screeched and skidded in place. I would push the car, my roommate would try to drive, then we’d switch.

This lasted for about fifteen minutes until a few people, whom neither of us knew, walked by and asked if we needed help. They didn’t have any gloves on, and it was still quite dark, but they were adamant about helping us get the car moving. They put their backpacks down and pushed with me in the snow. We slipped, fell, and stumbled for another ten minutes, until finally the car backed out into the road. My roommate and I actually started cheering, and all I could say to those people was “Thank you so much!” As I drove to South Campus, I reflect on how nice it is to live in a community where everyone is so kind and willing to take the time out of their day to lend a hand to someone who needs it. Those people could have just chuckled at the sight of us and moved on, but they didn’t. They saw someone who was clearly having a tough time, and they took action to help.

Ironically enough, I also realized while I was driving back to South campus that I had my emergency break on the entire time we were pushing the car (facepalm). Well, that will be the first thing I check next time I get stuck in the snow!

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.