Learning to Budget as a College Student

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Syracuse Smart Money Coaches

Living on your own means learning how to budget, which is especially important in college. I’ll admit though- as a senior, I am still pretty bad at budgeting. I’ve lived away from home for three years, the last year off campus and renting a house, but I never took the time to look at my finances and make a solid plan for spending. I found myself living week to week spending way too much money and then not spending anything to make up for it.

Luckily, Syracuse provides students with resources to help plan out budgets. And especially lucky for me, one of my closest friends, Taylor Pasquariello, is part of the team of student coaches qualified to help their peers create budgets and start investing in the future.

Taylor, a policy studies major and business management minor, has been a Smart Money coach (part of the Office of Financial Literacy) since her sophomore year. I asked Taylor what inspired her to become a coach:

“It just hit me how important it is for college students to start thinking about their financial future now and to start saving, especially since so many of us have loans and are unaware of  repayment options. I also have grown up knowing family members struggling financially and I know how it affects people emotionally.”

Taylor and I met freshman year in MAX 123, (Critical Issues for the United States). We ended up joining the same sorority and now she’s one of my best friends. When I was stressing last week about my budget, she offered to walk me step-by-step through the the budget creation process. She wasn’t working, I wasn’t paying her anything, and she probably had her own work she could have been doing, but she ended up counseling me for over an hour on how I can have a fun senior year and not break the bank.

Some of her best tips? Well, for me, I spend a lot of money buying food when I’m on campus instead of cooking at home, so just taking the time to go home to eat or bringing food on campus to snack on while I’m studying has already helped me save money. Taylor also encouraged me to make a savings account so I always have some money in case of emergencies or unexpected purchases.

You don’t have to know a Smart Money coach to get free help– students can sign up for Smart Money appointments on Orange Success. It’s great that SU provides students with resources to plan financially for their futures. It’s never too early (or too late) to start saving!

Samantha Trombley ’18, is public relations and policy studies major. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends. More blogs from Samantha Trombley.

 

Falling for Fall at ‘Cuse

One of the many great things about attending Syracuse University is getting to experience four seasons and the fun activities that a new season brings.  Growing up in Connecticut, I have fond memories of apple picking with my family, carving pumpkins with friends and going to haunted houses every weekend in October. When I was a freshman, I worried I was going to miss out on all my favorite fall activities. However, I quickly discovered that Syracuse University, and Central New York in general, is the perfect place to be for fall fun.

For anyone who loves fall as much as I do, here’s my personal Syracuse autumn bucket list.

1.)  Go apple picking: Apple picking season runs from mid-August to mid-October, so you have plenty of time during first semester to pick your own healthy and delicious snacks. New York is one of the top five apple-producing states, so if you love apples, it’s certainly a great place to be. There are three apple orchards within a 20-minute drive from SU, and the Department of Recreation Services hosts a weekend trip to Abbott’s Farm apple orchards in September. How ‘bout them apples?

2.)  Get lost in a corn maze- There are several farms in Onondaga County that have annual corn mazes in the fall. Get a small group of friends together one weekend to have a great day outdoors. Want to make it more of a challenge? Shut off your phone so you’re not tempted to GPS your way out!

3.)  Take a hike to see the fall foliage – The rolling hills and dense forests of Central New York offer some great hiking destinations. My personal favorite is Tinker Falls in Tully. I’ve hiked the trail in the spring and fall and had A popular hiking destination among Syracuse students is Green Lakes State Park, just a 20-minute drive from campus. Don’t have a car at school? No worries! The Department of Recreation Services offers a day trip to Green Lakes, so be sure to sign up!

4.)  Go to a haunted house- If you’re like me and love a good scare around Halloween, Syracuse has plenty. From haunted houses to hayrides, Central New York has it all. Orange After Dark, a series of late-night programs and events for SU undergrad students, offers a bus trip at the end of October to Fright Nights at the Fair. Students only pay $3! Check out scarycuse.com to get information on other haunted attractions.

5.)  Go to a pumpkin patch: Want to pick your own little pumpkin for your dorm room? Visit a local pumpkin patch. You can paint or carve a pumpkin to spruce up your new dorm décor. SU offers shuttles to local pumpkin patches in October. If you have access to a kitchen, try baking pumpkin seeds. It’s a delicious snack!

6.) Experience the Rocky Horror Picture Show: The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a cult classic and cultural phenomenon. When you go to see Rocky Horror around Halloween, don’t expect to just sit and watch- moviegoers are active participants in counter dialogue and scene reenactments, along with a designated reenactment cast. This year, SU drama students will be reenacting a performance at Schine Underground.

7.) Take a Ghost Tour: The Onondaga Historical Association offers guided tours of different locations in the area, focusing on local legends and haunts. This year, Ben Tupper, owner of Tupper Property Management, hosted free guided haunted tours of the university neighborhood the weekend before Halloween. Pretty spooky stuff!

8.)  Sign up for Run of the Dead: I discovered Run on the Dead freshman year when I was researching fun stuff to do around Halloween in ‘Cuse. If you’re looking for an adrenaline rush, this is the place to find it. Run of the Dead is a 5K obstacle course run that features “zombies” chasing participants through the course. Runners wear flags and dodge zombies while navigating the obstacles (mud pits, tires, monkey bars, etc.). Think Spartan Race meets a haunted trail of terror. This is by far my favorite Halloween activity. This year, a group of friends and I ran as a team and had a blast!

9.) Volunteer: Giving back to the Syracuse community is fun and rewarding, and there are plenty of opportunities to volunteer in the fall. I’ve volunteered at the Salvation Army and handed out candy to Boys and Girls Club members who trick or treat at dorms around campus. You can find volunteer opportunities on the Shaw Center website.

10.) Rewatch your favorite Halloween movie with your friends- Okay, so this one isn’t technically a Syracuse event, but this is something my friends and I do every October! This year, we watched Hocus Pocus to de-stress during midterms, armed with plenty of candy and popcorn. There’s no better way to relax during midterm madness!

This list is only a peek at some of the awesome things to do during the fall in Syracuse. Add your own!

Samantha Trombley ’18, is public relations and policy studies major. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends. More blogs from Samantha Trombley.

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Keeping Orange in the Family

Emily (left) and Claudia

Three years ago, Emily Lewis accompanied her sister Claudia when she moved into her Syracuse dorm to start her freshman year. At 15, Emily wasn’t seriously thinking about college just yet. Sure, she got to see the campus, which she enjoyed, but a part of her was hesitant to set her sights on ‘Cuse. “At the time, Syracuse was her thing” she laughs and nods at Claudia, who’s smiling, too.

Claudia and Emily grew up in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, and were about as close as any average siblings- they fought, then ignored each other for a bit, then got along. Before Claudia brought the Orange pride into the mix, the Lewis household was strictly University of Michigan- everything blue and maize. The girls’ older brother, mother and father are U Michigan alumni, and the Lewis’s make annual trips to Ann Arbor for football games. Basically, they were raised on college pride, so both Claudia and Emily knew that wherever they ended up for college, it would be a school with spirit. Claudia found that at Syracuse, but for most of her own college search, Emily focused on larger state schools like Penn State and Indiana University.

By the end of junior year, Emily was ready to apply to her top schools. In a way, she felt obligated to apply to Syracuse, since it had become a family school like U Michigan. “I felt like if I didn’t apply, I’d regret it for some reason, but I still didn’t think it was where I would end up.”

However, when she was accepted as a dual major in Arts and Sciences and Newhouse, she couldn’t pass up the opportunity.

Now, Claudia is a senior illustration major and Emily is a freshman dual major in arts and sciences and Newhouse, undeclared in both. They did not plan for their paths to both lead to Syracuse, but now they’re thankful. “We don’t hang out every second of every day, but it’s nice to know that if I want to talk about home or just see a familiar face, she’s there.” Claudia and Emily will share some memories at ‘Cuse, but their college experiences will each be their own. On the Hill, there’s room for both Lewis sisters to find their passions. Plus, since Claudia has a car, Emily has the luxury of getting off campus once in awhile! Claudia’s excited to spend her last year at Syracuse with her sister nearby. “I feel like everything is coming full circle- my college experience might be ending soon, but hers is just beginning. And now we’ll always have Syracuse, together.”

Samantha Trombley ’18, is public relations and policy studies major. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends. More blogs from Samantha Trombley.

Resume Building (Literally)

Summer’s comin’ in hot, and for a lot of college students, that means crunch time for internship hunting. Sam Schwartz, a fourth year student in Industrial Relations, took a different approach. He decided to do something big—he made the world’s largest resume.

I know what you’re thinking- how does one even go about doing that? Or come up with the idea? Sam was inspired by an internship application that required applicants to make something no one had ever made before. The application didn’t have a resume submission component, so he was worried he wouldn’t be able to come up with an idea that would showcase both his past experience and skills. But at 3:00 am on a Wednesday night in April, in the midst of applying to other internships, he thought, “hey, I could still show them my resume, I’ll just do it a little differently.”

Although there’s no official record for the world’s largest resume, Sam searched the web and didn’t find anything about other people trying to do something like this. He spent the following weekend building and filming his entire process, from designing the type on the computer to stenciling rows of letters on a tarp in Thornden Park. 

He spent countless hours hunched over, carefully lining up his stencils with the to-scale grid he made using yarn and stakes– since there was no measuring tape long enough for his 20X30 foott final product. A friend lent him a drone to get aerial footage, which shows just how huge this thing really is. Sam said there were definitely a few times he wanted to quit, especially when his alarm rang at 6:00 am on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. But he trudged on, and has a lot to show for it.

Sam’s video already has over 3,000 views on Vimeo. He recently took an internship offer at a creative advertising firm in Chicago, and although it’s not the same internship that inspired him to build the resume, he’s still glad he followed through with it. Sam admitted that right now, the 30 ft tarp is just taking up a lot of space in his living room. But the experience, and his video, are testaments to his skills. If you want to see more of Sam’s work, check out his portfolio (samschwartz.design).

 

Samantha Trombley ’18, is public relations and policy studies major. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends. More blogs from Samantha Trombley.

Why I Went Orange

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When deciding on how to address giving advice on choosing a college, I considered my stylistic options. Should I make a list of considerations? Should I take quotes from friends? Or, should I just reminisce and free associate?

I’ve decided on the last option. Three years ago, I was in your shoes, trying to decide where to go to school. I was down to four schools in April, all around the same price and fairly equal in academic prestige. I didn’t know how to make my decision. I visited each school over April break, and Syracuse was the last one I visited.

Don’t get me wrong, I enjoyed the other schools. The accepted students days were nice, and one university had the largest freshman dorms I’d ever seen. But none of them had that “wow” factor, which I couldn’t explain at the time but I think I can now. I was looking for a school that gave me butterflies, that made me so excited to be a part of the community that I wouldn’t feel like I was leaving home, but just going to a new one. I found that at Syracuse.

When I visited Syracuse for the first time, it was five days before I had to make my final decision on where to attend college. It was a beautiful spring day, and I was looking forward to touring Newhouse, seeing the quad- you know, the basics. The Accepted Students seminar in Newhouse was the first thing that made me think, “okay, there is something different about this place.” We heard professors and students speak about the amazing resources in Newhouse and broke up into small group tours. I felt welcomed and eager to start my own education here.

But the real catch for me was just walking around campus and seeing how happy everyone was. I saw students wearing Syracuse sweatshirts, Greek Life T’s, and club hoodies. I saw friends exchange quick hellos on their way to classes, happy to see each other but still keeping their eyes on the prize. It was the perfect blend of social and intellectual life that I did not realize I had been looking for. Not to mention how passionate people were about SU. One kid literally yelled at our tour group, “You’re gonna regret it if you don’t go here!” Okay, so maybe SU isn’t the right fit for everyone, but for me he was right- I’m thankful every day that I decided to attend Syracuse University.

My excitement only grew over the summer. Freshman year was a blur of excitement, new experiences and adjusting to independence. Going into my sophomore year, I was worried the novelty of college would wear off. However, I quickly realized that my love for Syracuse did not shrink- it only grew. Nervous excitement transformed into a comfortable familiarity. When I see student tours on campus, I smile wide because I want them to know that I truly love this place. I only have a year and a half left here, and it doesn’t seem like nearly enough time because I am so, so happy. However, I know that when the time comes, I’ll be ready to face the next chapter head-on, thanks to four years of personal growth and self-discovery here at SU.

 

Samantha Trombley ’18, is public relations and policy studies major. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends. More blogs from Samantha Trombley.

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Maybe I am a Typical Sorority Girl

To be honest, Greek life was never on my radar when I was applying to colleges. My cousin was in a sorority, but besides that, I had no connection to Greek life nor any desire to join. I used to even poke fun at sororities and believed every generalization made about sorority girls. In my eyes, sorority girls wore dresses and pearls, loved shopping, and never wore sweatpants. None of these are bad, but they definitely aren’t me.

Fast forward to the end of my first semester freshman year. I was on the fence about participating in recruitment. My roommate had been looking forward to signing up since September, but I almost backed out. I didn’t want to be someone I wasn’t. I didn’t want my friends at home to say I’d changed because I joined a sorority. The night before the deadline for signing up, my friend on the club lacrosse team, who is not in a sorority, convinced me to try recruitment. She said even though she personally didn’t like it, there was no harm in trying it out.

I still think about how thankful I am for her advice. I ended up going through recruitment and joining a house that was filled with amazing women from all walks of life. I’ve met some of my best friends through my sorority. They’re people who I can laugh with, people I can talk to, and people who inspire me to be my best self. It’s like being in seven different clubs, while only actually being in one. I love sports, I love volunteering, and I care about my grades. And these are all passions I have been able to pursue and enjoy while being in a sorority.

On weekends I participate in fun philanthropy events with my friends—everything from pancake eating contests to dodgeball tournaments, all while knowing the profits are going to a good cause, as each sorority and fraternity are involved with a specific charitable organization. On Halloween, my friends and I handed out candy to local youth students in the Boys and Girls Club who trick-or-treated on Walnut Avenue near campus. We have parties every weekend with hilarious themes, and I have never felt pressure to look, dress up, wear makeup, or act a certain way.

I now realize that my original perception of a “typical sorority girl” was based on looks alone. I now think a typical sorority girl is a positive way to describe any young woman who has found a home away from home in her Greek life.

 

Samantha Trombley ’18, is public relations and policy studies major. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends. More blogs from Samantha Trombley.

 

Do the Dorms Right

I can’t believe that last semester was my last semester living in the ‘Cuse dorms. I’m very excited to have a place off campus this fall, but dorm life is a such a great experience. You’re close to everything, constantly surrounded by friends, and you don’t have to worry about cooking for yourself or cleaning the bathroom. While ultra-convenient, living in a dorm still requires some planning and thought. Here I’ve listed my top five dorm room essentials, based on my on-campus housing experience:  

1. First Aid Kit/ Health Supplies box: Unfortunately, most people are bound to catch a cold at least once a semester (or three times, if you’re like me). It’s always good to have some cough drops or EmergenC on hand, especially during exams when it’s hard to find time to go to CVS.

2. Extra paper towels: Picture yourself lying in bed, studying (or watching Netflix.) You reach over to grab your cup of coffee without looking and spill it all over your desk. I find myself in this situation all too often. Trust me, toilet paper doesn’t get the job done. Keep a couple rolls of paper towels in your room so you don’t have to ask your neighbors for some or use your bath towel to wipe up your latest mess.

3. Doormat: Okay, this might not seem necessary, but trust me, it helps in a place like Syracuse. Coming home with muddy, snowy, wet boots at the end of a winter day and soaking the floor is not a fun way to end a long day of classes. Put your shoes on a small doormat right at the entrance. Not only will you keep the floor dry, but you’re also less likely to misplace your shoes and have to frantically search for them five minutes before class.

4. Bins for storage: Storage for clothes can be tricky, especially if you don’t plan on going home until the end of the semester. Syracuse weather changes very quickly, so even though it seems unnecessary when you move in August to pack a winter jacket, it’s not a bad idea. That being said, you don’t want to be rummaging through your winter hats and sweaters in September when it’s 60 degrees out. Stack storage bins under your bed to keep your clothes organized, easily accessible, but still out of the way.

5. Extra quarters/small bill for laundry: The laundry machines can be a bit temperamental. I’ve been stuck with a pile of wet clothes more than once when the card reader (which you can use to pay for laundry from money on your SuperCard account) wasn’t working. And it’s tougher than you’d think to find someone in the dorms with a spare quarter, so having a few bucks on hand can help you avoid air-drying clothes in your room or exchanging a $20 for 80 quarters.

There ya have it! Pack up these five extra things as you are getting ready to head to the hill and you are ready-made for an even smoother dorm experience.

 

Samantha Trombley ’18, is public relations and policy studies major. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends. More blogs from Samantha Trombley.

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SU (Abroad) Students Give Thanks

A year ago, one of my first published blogs for Syracuse Admissions focused on a seemingly simple question: What are Syracuse students thankful for? This was one of my favorite blogs to write. In the midst of busy college life, it was great to just sit and talk with people about what makes us happy, about the people in our lives who bring us joy. This year, I’m excited to share the 2016, second annual edition of what SU students are thankful for. This year, all of us are abroad and celebrating away from home but still as grateful as ever.

“I’m thankful for another year of life. Another year to grow and experience new things with my friends and family.” — Obi Afriyie, Junior, studying in Dublin, Cultural Foundations of Education and History Major, Member of Student Association, Founder of Syracuse Students Teaching Healthy Habits

“I am so thankful my parents pushed me to move to Italy and travel the world. I’ve realized how great a gift it is to be able to travel and see the world at 18 and I’m so happy I got that chance.”– Jessica Hume, Freshman, Discovery Florence

“I’m thankful for all the opportunities SU provides to its students. Whether it’s class, clubs, communities, or the chance to meet people different than you, I think it’s a university with truly something for everyone.”– Joey Dawson, Junior, studying in Strasbourg, Policy Studies and Information Management Major, Member of SU Kumquat and the Academic Integrity Student Panel

“Since being abroad I’ve realized the things I’m most thankful for. I’m most thankful for my family and friends because their support and love is what motivates and encourages me to do my best. I’m also thankful for the small experiences that I’ve been lucky enough to have and share with those I love. I will have these moments to cherish for the rest of my life and they have helped to shape who I am today.”– Alex Dorn, Junior, studying in Florence, Public Relations Major and Political Science Minor, Member of Public Relations Student Society of America and Hill Communications

 

Samantha Trombley ’18, is public relations and policy studies major. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends. More blogs from Samantha Trombley.

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Embracing Abroad

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I am currently studying abroad in Florence, Italy, with the Syracuse University Abroad program. This is my first trip outside of the United States — I’ve never even been to Canada. As this is my first time leaving the country, I naturally want to do anything and everything. When I was planning my weekend trips over the summer, I had every weekend booked. I wanted to visit all of the places I had only seen in movies or read about it books. In my mind, this was my once-in-a-lifetime experience, my chance to see the world.

When I got to Florence, the reality of time sunk in. Sure, three months sounds like a long time, but trying to squeeze in everything I wanted to do was impossible. On top of that, most of my friends who I am traveling with have already been to Europe, so some of the top places I wanted to go were places that they had already seen. I had a very specific vision of what I wanted my abroad experience to be, and when it didn’t go exactly as planned, I started obsessing about it. For most of September and the beginning of October, I was constantly online searching for places to travel to, trying to find the cheapest flights, texting friends trying to convince them to travel with me for the fourth weekend in a row.

A few days ago, I was sitting in a piazza near the SU Florence campus, using an app on my phone to search cheap flights. I realized I had been sitting there for 45 minutes, completely oblivious to everything going on around me. I did not see the beautiful street art two feet away from me, or the man playing the violin in the center of the piazza, or the brilliant hues of yellow and red in the changing leaves. When I looked up and took it all in, it hit me: I was spending so much time obsessing about seeing everything that I wasn’t really seeing anything.

I’ve been trying too hard to make this experience perfect. Studying abroad is an opportunity to discover your passions, see new things, and embrace cultures different from your own. It’s not about getting the most stamps on your passport. It’s about seeing what you can, living in the moment, and stepping out of your comfort zone. I closed most of those tabs a few days ago. I’m ready to see where the rest of the semester takes me, and hopefully I will be more open to the beauty right in front of me.

 

Samantha Trombley ’18, is public relations and policy studies major. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends. More blogs from Samantha Trombley.

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Winning Over Your Professors

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Starting college means getting used to a lot of new things: living in dorms, class lectures, and writing papers worth 30% of your grade. One of the things that can make the adjustment to college easier is developing good relationships with your professors. I’ve come up with a few do’s and don’ts for professor communication and classroom etiquette.

Unlike high school, college professors are not just at SU to teach. They also have their own research, and many of them work outside the university. College is a privilege, not a given, so professors are less likely to tolerate immature behavior then your high school teachers were. As such:

DON’T text during class. In a small classroom, it may seem like your being discrete with one hand on your notebook and the other under the desk, but these people have PhD’s- they know what you’re hiding. It may be difficult for a professor to see you texting in a large lecture hall, but you’re still distracting yourself from the important information that WILL BE ON THE EXAM!

DON’T surf the web during class. Some of your professors will allow you to bring your laptop to class. It’s very tempting to check Facebook or see how your fantasy football team is doing, but if your professor catches you, they won’t hesitate to call you out in front of everyone. In large lecture halls, a lot of professors have teaching assistants spread out through the audience, so even if your professor can’t see your screen, it’s possible a TA will.

DON’T pack up before the end of class. The rustling of papers three minutes before class is over is annoying and disruptive. This sends a message that you are not interested in what the professor has to say and are just watching the clock until you can leave.

DO proofread emails. Email is most professors’ choice way of communicating with students. Professors are very good about checking their emails. If you’re going to send an email, make sure you read through it so that it makes sense, gets to the point, and doesn’t have any spelling or grammatical errors. I’ve had professors correct my spelling in emails- trust me, it’s embarrassing.

DO go to office hours. Professors are happy to provide help during their office hours. If you want to go over a problem on a test or discuss a reading you didn’t quite understand, office hours are going to be your best friend. However, make sure you go to office hours with specific questions to ask- professors aren’t going to plan out a study guide for you.

DO participate in class. I know, I know, sometimes it’s embarrassing to be that kid who raises their hand. But this is me in every class. You don’t need to answer every question and wave your arm wildly in the air for an hour, but answering a question or two in class shows your professor that you are engaged and listening (participation points!)

This is by no means a definitive list of dos and don’ts–there’s a whole lot more, but the key idea is get to know your professor and how they run their classes. Some professors don’t mind if you eat a snack during class. Others find it disruptive. Take note of what your professors expect from you. Remember, your professors are not only your ticket to your education, but also potentially important networking connections. Who knows, you could be reaching out to one of your favorite professors in a few years for a letter of recommendation, so make your time in class count!

 

Samantha Trombley ’18, is public relations and policy studies major. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends. More blogs from Samantha Trombley.

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