Maybe I am a Typical Sorority Girl

To be honest, Greek life was never on my radar when I was applying to colleges. My cousin was in a sorority, but besides that, I had no connection to Greek life nor any desire to join. I used to even poke fun at sororities and believed every generalization made about sorority girls. In my eyes, sorority girls wore dresses and pearls, loved shopping, and never wore sweatpants. None of these are bad, but they definitely aren’t me.

Fast forward to the end of my first semester freshman year. I was on the fence about participating in recruitment. My roommate had been looking forward to signing up since September, but I almost backed out. I didn’t want to be someone I wasn’t. I didn’t want my friends at home to say I’d changed because I joined a sorority. The night before the deadline for signing up, my friend on the club lacrosse team, who is not in a sorority, convinced me to try recruitment. She said even though she personally didn’t like it, there was no harm in trying it out.

I still think about how thankful I am for her advice. I ended up going through recruitment and joining a house that was filled with amazing women from all walks of life. I’ve met some of my best friends through my sorority. They’re people who I can laugh with, people I can talk to, and people who inspire me to be my best self. It’s like being in seven different clubs, while only actually being in one. I love sports, I love volunteering, and I care about my grades. And these are all passions I have been able to pursue and enjoy while being in a sorority.

On weekends I participate in fun philanthropy events with my friends—everything from pancake eating contests to dodgeball tournaments, all while knowing the profits are going to a good cause, as each sorority and fraternity are involved with a specific charitable organization. On Halloween, my friends and I handed out candy to local youth students in the Boys and Girls Club who trick-or-treated on Walnut Avenue near campus. We have parties every weekend with hilarious themes, and I have never felt pressure to look, dress up, wear makeup, or act a certain way.

I now realize that my original perception of a “typical sorority girl” was based on looks alone. I now think a typical sorority girl is a positive way to describe any young woman who has found a home away from home in her Greek life.

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Do the Dorms Right

I can’t believe that last semester was my last semester living in the ‘Cuse dorms. I’m very excited to have a place off campus this fall, but dorm life is a such a great experience. You’re close to everything, constantly surrounded by friends, and you don’t have to worry about cooking for yourself or cleaning the bathroom. While ultra-convenient, living in a dorm still requires some planning and thought. Here I’ve listed my top five dorm room essentials, based on my on-campus housing experience:  

1. First Aid Kit/ Health Supplies box: Unfortunately, most people are bound to catch a cold at least once a semester (or three times, if you’re like me). It’s always good to have some cough drops or EmergenC on hand, especially during exams when it’s hard to find time to go to CVS.

2. Extra paper towels: Picture yourself lying in bed, studying (or watching Netflix.) You reach over to grab your cup of coffee without looking and spill it all over your desk. I find myself in this situation all too often. Trust me, toilet paper doesn’t get the job done. Keep a couple rolls of paper towels in your room so you don’t have to ask your neighbors for some or use your bath towel to wipe up your latest mess.

3. Doormat: Okay, this might not seem necessary, but trust me, it helps in a place like Syracuse. Coming home with muddy, snowy, wet boots at the end of a winter day and soaking the floor is not a fun way to end a long day of classes. Put your shoes on a small doormat right at the entrance. Not only will you keep the floor dry, but you’re also less likely to misplace your shoes and have to frantically search for them five minutes before class.

4. Bins for storage: Storage for clothes can be tricky, especially if you don’t plan on going home until the end of the semester. Syracuse weather changes very quickly, so even though it seems unnecessary when you move in August to pack a winter jacket, it’s not a bad idea. That being said, you don’t want to be rummaging through your winter hats and sweaters in September when it’s 60 degrees out. Stack storage bins under your bed to keep your clothes organized, easily accessible, but still out of the way.

5. Extra quarters/small bill for laundry: The laundry machines can be a bit temperamental. I’ve been stuck with a pile of wet clothes more than once when the card reader (which you can use to pay for laundry from money on your SuperCard account) wasn’t working. And it’s tougher than you’d think to find someone in the dorms with a spare quarter, so having a few bucks on hand can help you avoid air-drying clothes in your room or exchanging a $20 for 80 quarters.

There ya have it! Pack up these five extra things as you are getting ready to head to the hill and you are ready-made for an even smoother dorm experience.

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Early Decision Student Stories

null
Sam Walters, second from left, with some fellow students

 

Matthew DeMattia ’19, Dual Political Science and Television, Radio, and Film major

Why did you apply ED?

I applied ED to Syracuse because I knew, without a doubt, that Syracuse was the school that I wanted to attend. It took me two visits, about 10 hours of driving, and weeks of online research, but I had come to the conclusion that SU was my dream school and that if I wanted to maximize my chance of getting in, I needed to commit by applying ED.

What was the best part about applying ED?

The best part about applying ED is certainly finding out early. I remember receiving my acceptance to Syracuse in mid-December, and that gave me the ability to relax and enjoy the second half of my senior year of high school. While all my peers were frantically trying to finish their applications and anxiously awaiting their decisions, I was simply able to enjoy my last few months of high school, which was absolutely awesome.

What would you say to students who applied ED this year?

I would tell students who applied ED that they made a fantastic decision.

 

Megan Hart ’17- Communication Sciences and Disorders major

Why did you apply ED?

After setting foot on the Syracuse campus, I knew I had to apply ED. Any person I talked to who was affiliated with the university- whether it be a professor, student, alum, etc.- was so incredibly passionate about the university and it was infectious. I know I’ll be 80 years old and tell my grandkids, “I went to Syracuse 60 years ago and am still really excited and proud to have been a part of that.” The alumni network was also a huge draw for me. To know there are thousands upon thousands of people who have graduated and moved on from SU, yet are willing to reach back and help us make the most of our experience, was a huge plus to me.

What was the best part about applying ED?

Aside from the relief of knowing where I was going to college before Christmas of my senior year of high school, I had lots more time than some of my friends to start preparing for college in all sorts of ways. I was able to start prepping physical belongings for my dorm with the weight of the decision lifted off of my shoulders, but I was also able to get on to mentally preparing and being excited about the journey I was going to embark on.

What would you say to students who applied ED this year?

It makes me so happy to hear when students applied early decision! I’m so excited that you’re already living up to the enthusiasm and drive that is the embodiment of Orange Pride. Make this process your own and let your belief in yourself run wild. Some pretty amazing things will happen when you do.

 

Hope Meltser ’18, Dual Graphic Design and Selected Studies in Education major

Why did you apply ED?

I applied early decision because as soon as I came onto campus I knew that Syracuse was the place for me. None of the other colleges I visited had the same feel or reaction. On a less poetic note, I was also extremely stressed out by the idea of choosing a college and the idea of having it done as soon as possible at a school I loved was too good to pass up.

What was the best part about applying ED?

I heard about my admission to Syracuse on December 9, 2013 at 5:00 p.m. and from that point forward I was done! Since I applied ED, Syracuse was the only college application that I had to submit because I heard back early enough that I didn’t have to finish (or submit and pay for) any of the other applications I had started. So, while all my other friends were still having minor breakdowns I was done, happy, and ready to finish out my senior year.

What would you say to students who applied ED this year?

Smart decision everyone!

 

Ankita Varman ’19, Dual Public Relations and Management major

Why did you apply ED?

I applied ED because I knew Syracuse was the place I wanted to be. I heard about the school when I was searching for a school strong in both public relations and business. Then, I heard about the Posse scholarship in Atlanta (I am originally from Johns Creek, GA) and applied through that.

What was the best part about applying ED?

Being secure in my choice and finding out early about my future. I avoided the stress that comes with figuring out college plans second semester of senior year in high school.

What would you say to students who applied ED this year?

Be confident in your choice! You made it because you loved it, and no matter what happens, trust that choice that you made.

 

Samantha “Sam” Walters ’20, Undeclared

Why did you apply ED?

I applied early decision because as soon as I stepped foot on campus at Syracuse, I knew that this was the school for me. I absolutely fell in love with everything about the school, especially the welcoming spirit of the Orange. I also applied early decision because not only was Syracuse my number one choice but I wanted to hear back sooner.

What was the best part about applying ED?

The best part was knowing where I was going to college before I even went on winter break during my senior year of high school. I also liked that I only ended up applying to one college, which was Syracuse, so I never stressed too much about the college application process.

What would you say to students who applied ED this year?

I would hope that they are as happy with their decision as I am and welcome to the Orange family!

 

Learn more about applying Early Decision.

Making an Impact on Campus

null

The Student Association (SA) at Syracuse University was created in 1944 to serve as the liaison between the student body and the university. Each year, SA rolls out a variety of leadership initiatives that confront and improve the student experience at SU. Having been at SU for almost four full years now, I have noticed some drastic changes that have gone a long way in fostering a safe and inclusive environment for students. Here are some recent initiatives SA has taken on:

Heat lamps in bus stops

This initiative was introduced last year and has since been fully rolled out. The newly installed heat lamps at major campus bus stops, keep students warm while waiting for the campus shuttles and make the cold temperatures much more bearable.

Bike Share Program

Although the program only kicked off this semester, it has been a long time coming for SU students. According to Jane Hong, recent SU graduate and former SA Vice President, “We have a fairly large population of students that bike around campus and the local community. We knew that a program like this would quite literally mobilize students to explore the surrounding area, and get out of the orange bubble.”

The program encourages students to immerse themselves in what’s beyond the university campus and explore the city of Syracuse. Hong also expressed that “what impresses me the most about the Bike Share Program is thinking about how many students actually contributed to this initiative — all because they wanted this to be a reality for future students.”

The bikes are available by reservation with a signed liability waiver. The reservations are free to make and bikes can be picked up and returned at the rack outside Schine Student Center.

Free feminine products on campus

One of SA’s many student life initiatives is to provide menstrual products in all non-residential buildings, starting Oct. 28. With this new initiative, students will have access to free tampons and pads in every bathroom on campus. This campus-wide plan will change the taboo topic of female menstruation; by projecting a positive light on this unspoken issue, SA is taking a stance for inclusiveness in a college campus.

Adding new minors

SA is a major advocate of students declaring new minors. This significant change in the traditional structure and its curriculums was mobilized to fulfill students’ diverse passions.

“My freshman or sophomore year, one of our assembly representatives successfully advocated for a minor in Arabic,” Hong recalled. “He was an Arabic major, and he knew there was so much for students to gain from being able to minor in a Middle Eastern language. The university and the office of academic affairs agreed, and now students have the opportunity to minor in an extremely important global language like Arabic.” Students can speak to their academic advisors regarding the new minors and the process of declaring one. View a list of SU’s current minors.

Chat and Dine

In  an effort to encourage relationship-building and networking between students and faculty, SA kicked off the ‘Chat and Dine’ initiative two years ago and has since proven to be a student favorite. The program offers free lunch at Goldstein Alumni & Faculty Center for small groups of students and staff or faculty members.The program serves as an alternative to office hours, with many students opting to talk about career goals and academic advice. Students can apply here to be considered for the program. Students just have to provide detail on the reason for the meeting and SA arranges the rest.

In recent years, SA has been pushing further to accomplish initiatives that will benefit students and faculty as a whole. With the implementation of new amenities and programs, SA has consistently provided concrete solutions to many of the university’s issues. For more information on SA and how to join, visit their website and follow them on Twitter.

 

Eric Chuang is a senior at Syracuse University studying Public Relations at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications with a minor in English & Textual Studies. Additionally, he is part of the Fashion & Beauty Communications Milestone Program. Eric is a California native, dog enthusiast, fervent traveler, and sushi connoisseur. When not taking Buzzfeed quizzes or coming up with clever Instagram captions, he can most likely be found jamming to Taylor Swift’s “1989” album.

SU (Abroad) Students Give Thanks

A year ago, one of my first published blogs for Syracuse Admissions focused on a seemingly simple question: What are Syracuse students thankful for? This was one of my favorite blogs to write. In the midst of busy college life, it was great to just sit and talk with people about what makes us happy, about the people in our lives who bring us joy. This year, I’m excited to share the 2016, second annual edition of what SU students are thankful for. This year, all of us are abroad and celebrating away from home but still as grateful as ever.

“I’m thankful for another year of life. Another year to grow and experience new things with my friends and family.” — Obi Afriyie, Junior, studying in Dublin, Cultural Foundations of Education and History Major, Member of Student Association, Founder of Syracuse Students Teaching Healthy Habits

“I am so thankful my parents pushed me to move to Italy and travel the world. I’ve realized how great a gift it is to be able to travel and see the world at 18 and I’m so happy I got that chance.”– Jessica Hume, Freshman, Discovery Florence

“I’m thankful for all the opportunities SU provides to its students. Whether it’s class, clubs, communities, or the chance to meet people different than you, I think it’s a university with truly something for everyone.”– Joey Dawson, Junior, studying in Strasbourg, Policy Studies and Information Management Major, Member of SU Kumquat and the Academic Integrity Student Panel

“Since being abroad I’ve realized the things I’m most thankful for. I’m most thankful for my family and friends because their support and love is what motivates and encourages me to do my best. I’m also thankful for the small experiences that I’ve been lucky enough to have and share with those I love. I will have these moments to cherish for the rest of my life and they have helped to shape who I am today.”– Alex Dorn, Junior, studying in Florence, Public Relations Major and Political Science Minor, Member of Public Relations Student Society of America and Hill Communications

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Embracing Abroad

null

I am currently studying abroad in Florence, Italy, with the Syracuse University Abroad program. This is my first trip outside of the United States — I’ve never even been to Canada. As this is my first time leaving the country, I naturally want to do anything and everything. When I was planning my weekend trips over the summer, I had every weekend booked. I wanted to visit all of the places I had only seen in movies or read about it books. In my mind, this was my once-in-a-lifetime experience, my chance to see the world.

When I got to Florence, the reality of time sunk in. Sure, three months sounds like a long time, but trying to squeeze in everything I wanted to do was impossible. On top of that, most of my friends who I am traveling with have already been to Europe, so some of the top places I wanted to go were places that they had already seen. I had a very specific vision of what I wanted my abroad experience to be, and when it didn’t go exactly as planned, I started obsessing about it. For most of September and the beginning of October, I was constantly online searching for places to travel to, trying to find the cheapest flights, texting friends trying to convince them to travel with me for the fourth weekend in a row.

A few days ago, I was sitting in a piazza near the SU Florence campus, using an app on my phone to search cheap flights. I realized I had been sitting there for 45 minutes, completely oblivious to everything going on around me. I did not see the beautiful street art two feet away from me, or the man playing the violin in the center of the piazza, or the brilliant hues of yellow and red in the changing leaves. When I looked up and took it all in, it hit me: I was spending so much time obsessing about seeing everything that I wasn’t really seeing anything.

I’ve been trying too hard to make this experience perfect. Studying abroad is an opportunity to discover your passions, see new things, and embrace cultures different from your own. It’s not about getting the most stamps on your passport. It’s about seeing what you can, living in the moment, and stepping out of your comfort zone. I closed most of those tabs a few days ago. I’m ready to see where the rest of the semester takes me, and hopefully I will be more open to the beauty right in front of me.

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Winning Over Your Professors

null

Starting college means getting used to a lot of new things: living in dorms, class lectures, and writing papers worth 30% of your grade. One of the things that can make the adjustment to college easier is developing good relationships with your professors. I’ve come up with a few do’s and don’ts for professor communication and classroom etiquette.

Unlike high school, college professors are not just at SU to teach. They also have their own research, and many of them work outside the university. College is a privilege, not a given, so professors are less likely to tolerate immature behavior then your high school teachers were. As such:

DON’T text during class. In a small classroom, it may seem like your being discrete with one hand on your notebook and the other under the desk, but these people have PhD’s- they know what you’re hiding. It may be difficult for a professor to see you texting in a large lecture hall, but you’re still distracting yourself from the important information that WILL BE ON THE EXAM!

DON’T surf the web during class. Some of your professors will allow you to bring your laptop to class. It’s very tempting to check Facebook or see how your fantasy football team is doing, but if your professor catches you, they won’t hesitate to call you out in front of everyone. In large lecture halls, a lot of professors have teaching assistants spread out through the audience, so even if your professor can’t see your screen, it’s possible a TA will.

DON’T pack up before the end of class. The rustling of papers three minutes before class is over is annoying and disruptive. This sends a message that you are not interested in what the professor has to say and are just watching the clock until you can leave.

DO proofread emails. Email is most professors’ choice way of communicating with students. Professors are very good about checking their emails. If you’re going to send an email, make sure you read through it so that it makes sense, gets to the point, and doesn’t have any spelling or grammatical errors. I’ve had professors correct my spelling in emails- trust me, it’s embarrassing.

DO go to office hours. Professors are happy to provide help during their office hours. If you want to go over a problem on a test or discuss a reading you didn’t quite understand, office hours are going to be your best friend. However, make sure you go to office hours with specific questions to ask- professors aren’t going to plan out a study guide for you.

DO participate in class. I know, I know, sometimes it’s embarrassing to be that kid who raises their hand. But this is me in every class. You don’t need to answer every question and wave your arm wildly in the air for an hour, but answering a question or two in class shows your professor that you are engaged and listening (participation points!)

This is by no means a definitive list of dos and don’ts–there’s a whole lot more, but the key idea is get to know your professor and how they run their classes. Some professors don’t mind if you eat a snack during class. Others find it disruptive. Take note of what your professors expect from you. Remember, your professors are not only your ticket to your education, but also potentially important networking connections. Who knows, you could be reaching out to one of your favorite professors in a few years for a letter of recommendation, so make your time in class count!

 

Samantha is a junior majoring in public relations and policy studies. She is originally from Franklin, CT. Sam is a member of Hill Communications, the on-campus public relations firm. She is also a member of the Girl Code Movement, the women’s club lacrosse team, and the Kappa Alpha Theta women’s fraternity. In her free time she enjoys hiking, volunteering, traveling, and spending time with friends.

Four Years, Four “Houses”, Four Unique Experiences

null

Where you live in college plays a big role in making friends and shaping your experience. As a senior, I have now lived in four completely different places, all of which have their own unique perks and quirks. Below is a breakdown of every place I have lived (or currently live) during my years at SU:

Freshman Year: Brewster, Boland, Brockway Halls (BBB)

I am grateful to have lived here as a freshman because BBB has an extremely close-knit community, likely due to the fact that these are freshmen-only dorms. I immediately became friends with not only the students on my floor, but also those on many other floors. There is also a strong sense of inclusion in BBB as there are plenty of people from other countries and diverse backgrounds. With its own gym located in the basement, BBB residents do not need to leave the building to exercise. Even if you don’t use the gym though, by the end of the school year, you will be in great shape, simply because you will have a bit of a walk to class from BBB, and because it is located on one of Syracuse’s many hills.

Sophomore Year: Marion Hall

Located in the heart of campus, Marion Hall is minutes away from many major buildings. The hall’s easy access to Bird Library made me a library regular my sophomore year. My room was very close to Walnut Avenue, which houses sororities and fraternities, so on some Friday nights, the noise level was a bit loud. (If you are someone who may be in your dorm on weekend nights this may be more of an issue, but if you are someone who enjoys going out, it shouldn’t be a huge problem.) Being a smaller dorm, there wasn’t the same level of community that I enjoyed in BBB but I definitely liked the convenience.

Junior Year: Harrison Street

My junior year, I lived at the top of the hill on Harrison Street, right across from the Chancellor’s house. One unique perk was our apartment’s roof access. It was probably the main reason we signed the lease so quickly, and during the year we hung out up there quite a bit. The location is relatively close to the academic buildings I took classes in and by then, most of my friends lived nearby. Being from California, it was important that if I lived off-campus the house was furnished. Luckily my rent in this house included a bed, refrigerator, desk and other basic furniture. This isn’t necessarily the norm, but with so many out-of-state, and international students at Syracuse, there is definitely furnished off-campus housing to be found. Being out of the dorms was different– but nice– because I was still able to live with my friends, but I had my own room and therefore more personal space.

Senior Year: Euclid Avenue

Senior year is here and I am ending my college career with a great housing arrangement! This year I am living on Euclid Avenue, a very lively street with lots of students and always something going on. Most of my friends are also living around this area, and there has never been a dull moment. The walk to campus is by no means brutal, but it is the longest walk I have had since arriving at SU. I have found that the trickiest part about living off-campus is getting food if you don’t have a campus meal plan. If you or one of your roommates has a car, you can buy groceries and cook for yourself (or get a lot of takeout!) Either way, you just need to plan ahead so you don’t get caught with nothing to eat.

Every dorm and apartment has a different personality, from its location and student community to its dining halls and other amenities. Looking back, I think it’s important to make the most of your freshman experience–that’s where I really found my group of friends. No matter what dorm you are assigned to though, you will have a great first year as you will be surrounded by new friends who will make wherever you live your home.

Check out more dorms, and the rest of the Syracuse campus with the virtual tour!

 

Eric Chuang is a senior at Syracuse University studying Public Relations at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications with a minor in English & Textual Studies. Additionally, he is part of the Fashion & Beauty Communications Milestone Program. Eric is a California native, dog enthusiast, fervent traveler, and sushi connoisseur. When not taking Buzzfeed quizzes or coming up with clever Instagram captions, he can most likely be found jamming to Taylor Swift’s “1989” album.

Being an LGBT Student at Syracuse University

""

It is inevitable to feel a bit apprehensive about applying to colleges. You never truly understand the culture of a school until you are attending it. One of the many reasons I decided to attend SU was the amount of pride the school takes in supporting the LGBT community and ensuring a prejudice-free educational environment for everyone. In 2014, Syracuse University was ranked as one of the top 10 LGBT-friendly colleges in the nation by The Huffington Post. This ranking shows just how accepting the institution is of the LGBT community and that SU is constantly trying to ensure that everyone feels accepted here.

SU’s LGBT Resource Center is the on-campus source for anything relating to marginalized genders and sexualities. By encouraging meaningful dialogues exploring social justice, integrity, advocacy, and leadership through weekly discussion groups, students are able to come together and create a safer space for everyone. At the LGBT Resource Center, I often meet like-minded peers who take pride in their sexual identities and are active in various initiatives enacted by the resource center. For example, the “You Are Not Alone” annual campaign seeks to convey a message of acceptance for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, and asexual communities. Every year, in honor of National Coming Out Day on October 11, the university releases a list of SU students, faculty, staff, and alumni who have penned their support for the cause. (check out last year’s list)

In addition, the LGBT Resource Center hosts events, socials, and fundraisers that align with their mission to break social barriers and boundaries. Last year, the resource center was able to bring “Orange is the New Black” actress, Laverne Cox, to SU to speak about her journey as a transgender woman. She gave significant insight on being a minority who is queer and how that has triggered many hardships in her life. She has been so inspirational to me and it was truly an honor to listen to her shed light on bullying and bigotry while educating people on misconceptions they have regarding the transgender community.

SU is a community that is welcoming and accepting of student backgrounds. Diversity is what accelerates this university forward and creates an environment that is suitable for all students. I have always felt comfortable expressing myself and being who I really am at SU because everyone is open-minded here. I have never witnessed or heard of any hateful acts committed toward LGBT students here and that’s a true testament to the myriad resources the university’s uses to educate students on sexual diversity. The university’s active efforts to demonstrate its support for the LGBT community continue to validate my decision to attend this institution and there is no place I would rather be than at Syracuse University.

 

Eric Chuang is a senior at Syracuse University studying Public Relations at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications with a minor in English & Textual Studies. Additionally, he is part of the Fashion & Beauty Communications Milestone Program. Eric is a California native, dog enthusiast, fervent traveler, and sushi connoisseur. When not taking Buzzfeed quizzes or coming up with clever Instagram captions, he can most likely be found jamming to Taylor Swift’s “1989” album.

Class of 2016 Students Reflect on their Years at Syracuse

null

From pulling consecutive all-nighters and weekends with friends, seniors have plenty to reminisce over. This week, I went around campus in search of some insight from SU’s graduating seniors about what they will miss the most and what they learned here. Here’s what they said:

Erin Miller: Advertising major

“Syracuse has an amazing student startup scene. I’m really going to miss all the entrepreneurial hubs on and off campus. It’s going to be crazy not being around people that are super stoked about an orange school 24/7, but we got to spread that orange pride somehow: by taking over the world.”

Tringa Ajeti: Theater Management major and CRS minor

“I transferred to Syracuse so unfortunately I’ve only been here for three years, but I completely mean it when I say that transferring to SU was the best decision I’ve ever made. I really owe it all to the amazing friends I’ve made throughout this whole college journey- especially the ones I’ve shared crazy (but great!) memories with. While there have been a few lows here and there (like the number of all nighters I pulled in hopes of passing my core classes…) I can leave Syracuse knowing that I’ve really had a great college experience and that if I could go back and do it all over again, there would be nothing I would change about it.”

Victoria Pineda: Marketing Management major

“Coming to Syracuse was the best decision I made. Towards the end of my freshman year I was so close to transferring, but the new friendships I made influenced me to stay in the end.”

Cori Rosen: Television, Radio, Film major/ Marketing minor

“I’ll definitely miss the people I met over the past four years at Syracuse. But I’ll miss the greek salad from King David’s more.”

Celeste Sanchez: Political Philosophy major, Management Studies minor

“I’ve learned so much about who I truly am. I’ve grown up, gone through highs and lows, and have made life-changing friends. These four years definitely fly by so don’t take any of your time here for granted. Keep up with your classes, but still make sure to maintain a good balance and have fun.”

Eunice Kim: Advertising and International Relations dual major

“My four years at Syracuse were made up of the highest and lowest moments of my life, which really pushed me to think about who I am and where my identity lies. I am grateful that God was faithful in providing loving and caring friends who walked alongside me to explore these questions. I can confidently say that if it wasn’t for my time at SU, I would have never become the person that I am today.”

Jane Hong: Broadcast Digital Journalism and Political Science minor

“It’s hard for me to imagine not physically being surrounded by people who are as passionate, vibrant, and eager to learn: people who have constantly challenged me to think and see differently. Syracuse has rooted itself in me. And while it’ll always be a part of me, it’s tough to think that I won’t always physically be here to be a part of the community.”

Michelle Yan: Photojournalism and Psychology dual major

“Looking at the people I met my freshmen year – from my roommate to my photo professors/classmates to friends from church to God – and seeing how much of a stranger we were to each other to seeing how intimately we know each other now, I feel like things really came full circle…. Like an orange.”

Kenzie Lau-Kee: PR and Marketing dual major

“I’m going to miss how close I live to all my friends and how it’s socially acceptable to go out four nights a week.”

Paola Suro: Broadcast Digital Journalism major, Marketing and Psychology minors

“I was always told to enjoy college because it would be the best four years of my life. And that it all comes and goes in the blink of an eye. I never really understood what that meant until this semester. Coming to Syracuse was the best decision I’ve ever made, because I’ve not only grown, but I also made friendships that will last a lifetime. Go Orange!”

Alexander Lai: Biology and Psychology dual major

“I can honestly say that being at Syracuse has changed me for the better. I’m leaving college a completely different person, and I couldn’t be more grateful for all the laughs, lessons, sleepless nights, snowy days, and friends I’ve made along the way. I really did find myself here, so thanks, Syracuse, for reminding me in moments where I felt like nothing, that just being here was already everything. It was perfect.”

 

Eric Chuang is a senior at Syracuse University studying Public Relations at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications with a minor in English & Textual Studies. Additionally, he is part of the Fashion & Beauty Communications Milestone Program. Eric is a California native, dog enthusiast, fervent traveler, and sushi connoisseur. When not taking Buzzfeed quizzes or coming up with clever Instagram captions, he can most likely be found jamming to Taylor Swift’s “1989” album.